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Apple’s New iPhones May Look More Like iPads, And The HomePod Might Be Cheaper

Rumour has it that Apple’s upcoming iPhones will look more like iPads than previous models. A Bloomberg report has claimed that there will be four new 5G handset models released this year: two cheaper devices and two higher-end smartphones.

It is expected that the new smartphones will go back to having flat screens, rather than the sloping edges that were featured on Apple’s latest models.

The most premium smartphone in the new line-up is rumoured to have a larger screen than the 6.5-inch display on the iPhone 11 Pro Max, and three rear cameras instead of two.

Like the iPad Pro that Apple launched in March, the new iPhones will most likely have the Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) scanner, which works with the cameras, motion sensor and frameworks to create an accurate 3D map.

iPad Pro

Bloomberg also speculated that the coming models may have smaller notches (that is, the cut-out at the top of your phone screen), which may mean the removal of the selfie camera and face ID sensors.

In addition, Apple is tipped to launch a cheaper and smaller version of the HomePod. These adjustments may give Apple a larger share of the network speaker market. In the last quarter of 2019 HomePods only accounted for 4.1% of the market – while Amazon had 35.5% and Google had 30%.

The lower price point may also distinguish the HomePod as one of Apple’s cheaper speakers, as there is speculation that Apple may be planning its entrance into the home entertainment market. In early March the company acquired the patent for a ‘wireless and wired’ home theatre speaker, and prior to that they were granted a patent for an untethered wireless audio system.

Apple HomePod 4

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