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Apple Rumoured To Be Working On ARM-Powered Mac

Apple is reportedly gearing up to release its first Mac computer powered an in-house designed ARM processor next year. According to Bloomberg, Apple is developing three Mac processors, based on the A14 processor of the upcoming iPhone 12.

The new ARM processor will aim to be faster than those found in the latest iPhone and iPad models, which featured Apple’s own A13 Bionic chip and A12Z Bionic chip, respectively.

Bloomberg reported that the first generation of Mac processors will have eight high-performing processing cores and at least four energy-efficient cores, and is exploring the possibility of processors with more than 12 for products further down the track.

Processors in the latest Macbook Air has two to four cores, while the latest MacBook Pro has six to eight cores.

This development is in line with Apple’s recent moves to design more of its own chips, further reducing their use of Intel chips, which would be a major blow to Intel. Last year Apple also dropped a deal with Intel on wireless modem. Shares in Intel fell by 5% overnight, despite the 23% jump in revenue over Q1 2020.

It is thought that Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing will build the new Mac chips, with components based on the company’s existing five-nanometre production technique.

However, shifting away from Intel and towards a more in-house approach may be disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Bloomberg said: “Given work-from-home orders and disruptions in the company’s Asia-based supply chain, the shift could be delayed.”

Apple is yet to officially comment on the processing chip rumours, but it is thought the company may address this area at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference to be held in June.

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