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TNT Struggling To Deliver As Petya Aftermath Continues

Seven days after the Petya malware attack infected international courier giant TNT Express – now owned by the USA-based FedEx – the company’s Australian operations were reported to be still struggling to make deliveries, after being hit by the malware last week.

Despite many warnings, it appears the courier company was unprepared to deal with the situation, which reportedly “ravaged its business-critical systems globally”.

Australian customer deliveries have been delayed, while the MyTNT user portal yesterday was still not operational, nor were the company’s internal communications networks functioning, according to a number of news reports.

A TNT spokesperson warned that customers may continue to experience service delays and restrictions “in the short term”. “We regret any inconvenience this may cause and ask for their understanding,” the spokesperson said.

The company did not provide an estimated time of restoration, nor detail on the extent to which its IT environment had been impacted.

Cadbury’s Hobart factory and two other mainland operations handled by the Spanish Mondelez group, have remained out of action.A Mondelez statement at the weekend said the international company “continues to make progress to fully restore its operations … While there is still work to be done, we continue to restore functionality to a number of key systems.”

Macquarie Telecom MD Aidan Tudehope last week expressed exasperation at the lack of preparedness, despite many warnings, by Australian and international organisations.

He said it is time for government to take “firm action” to address the issue of organisations failing to “take even the most rudimentary steps to fortify their ICT systems.”

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