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Laser TV Market Explodes But Does It Have A Future & Will Retailers Back Them?

The laser TV market has exploded this month with Samsung Epson and Sony announcing new laser models, that will deliver up to 130” inches of image on a wall, the big question is how good they are, and will retailers range them due to the need to demonstrate a product that takes up a large amount of instore space.

At the top end Sony is going to sell a $100K model that is custom built to deliver true 4K performance and designed for the custom install home theatre market.

Currently brands such as BenQ, Epson and LG are selling short throw projectors and this week Samsung announced their new $9,950 Premiere, 4K Ultra Short Throw laser projector while Epson introduced the EH-LS500B Ultra Short Throw Laser Projector both are designed to deliver up to 130” inches of screen size.

ChannelNews understands that JB Hi Fi is looking to range the Samsung Premiere model but only in selected stores.

Hisense has a short throw projector that is a shocker when compared to the slick new models from the likes of LG, Samsung and Epson.

The only problem that retailers are going to struggle to demonstrate these new projectors because to display them properly they are going to need a lot of space and a darkened area.

As for a difference between models the BenQ, Samsung, Epson and LG offerings all feature the same Texas Instruments DLP chipset technology.

This is an excellent technology that is used in cinema projectors around the world.

The fast speed of the micromirrors in this chipset sets DLP display technology apart and is at the heart of what delivers bright, colourful, and crisp pictures and text.

So, what you have is basically the same projection chipset technology wrapped around different designs for the laser projector box.

Additional software can offer a difference but primarily the technical capabilities of these mass market laser projectors are similar and based on a TI DLP chipset which has been around for several years.

Epson claims their new product offers up to 20,000 hours of virtually maintenance free operation via laser technology, presenting ultra-bright images of 4,000 lumens colour and 4,000 lumens white.

A dedicated 4K enhancement processor uses pixel-shifting resolution-enhancement tech to present an immersive display experience, with the projector housing a dedicated full 10-bit HDR processor – using 100% of the HDR source information.

The system features a contrast ratio up to 2,500,000:1, for deep blacks and brilliant, impressive colours.
Samsung is set to sell two models of The Premiere: the LSP9T, which offers a 130-inch projection, peak brightness of up to 2,800 ANSI lumens, and bears the claim of being “the world’s first HDR10+ certified projector with triple laser technology.” The LSP7T is the step-down model, measuring in at a mere 120-inch projection.

Their press release was short on specifications.
The BenQ 4K LK970 4K Laser Projector delivers 20,000 hours of perfect performance, LK970’s flexible installation features such as H/V lens shift, big zoom, 360° projection and portrait capability make it a versatile projector perfect for diverse venues. The price is $12K.

Samsung is set to sell two models of The Premiere: the LSP9T, which offers a 130-inch projection, peak brightness of up to 2,800 ANSI lumens, and bears the claim of being “the world’s first HDR10+ certified projector with triple laser technology.” The LSP7T is the step-down model, measuring in at a mere 120-inch projection.

Their press release was short on specifications.

The BenQ 4K LK970 4K Laser Projector delivers 20,000 hours of perfect performance, LK970’s flexible installation features such as H/V lens shift, big zoom, 360° projection and portrait capability make it a versatile projector perfect for diverse venues. The price is $12K

Sony’s new flagship 4K professional SXRD laser projector, the VPL-GTZ380 delivers HDR performance with its high contrast, brightness and wide colour gamut in a compact body size (51kg)”. Sony claims this model is capable of 10,000 lumens and able to deliver a reported 500 nits on a 4m screen.

Unlike other manufacturers the Japanese Company utilises their own Sony X1 processor. It incorporates a newly-developed 0.74” native 4K SXRD panel with improved light stability and a new laser light source using a red laser diode in addition to the two different-wavelength blue laser diodes. Sony says, “this enables the model to achieve an impressive 10,000 lumens and a wide colour gamut of 100% DCI-P3 without any loss of brightness.”

The issue now is will Australians choose to switch from a large TV to a laser projector and will they get the same quality picture they get with a large TV?

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