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Adobe Attempt To Screw Older Photoshop License Owners Backfires

Adobe’s desperation to generate new revenue has been exposed with the big US software Company now trying to stop consumers who have paid for a packaged and fully licensed version of their software from using their software.

Adobe who is constantly forcing users to re log in to their cloud-based Creative Suite software even when they have a license for two machines is now threatening packaged owners of their software that they face litigation if they continue using the older version.

Recently Adobe emailed customers bluntly pointing to their small print policy telling them that they had to abide the company’s rules.

‘We have recently discontinued certain older versions of Creative Cloud applications and a result, under the terms of our agreement, you are no longer licensed to use them,’ Adobe said in the email.

This has ignited a firestorm on social media.

ChannelNews understands that Dolby recently attempted to exercise its legal right to audit Adobe to make sure that the company was properly distributing licensing costs across their software — a new agreement bases fees based on how many users are running the software was their objective.

Adobe declined to allow the audit and now Dolby has sued arguing that the company has breached its contract.

Adobe have not said why they refused Dolby’s request.

In 2013 Adobe switched to a subscription model that forced customers to pay in perpetuity for its software — the decision alienated some customers but increased its revenues.

Now subscription growth has slowed so Adobe has turned to existing customer in an effort to generate a new revenue stream using the Court case with Dolby as a reason.

‘Please be aware that should you continue to use the discontinued version(s), you may be at risk of potential claims of infringement by third parties.’ Adobe told their Photoshop customer base.

‘… [It’s] absolutely crazy. I’ve paid for these products for the last three years and now i suddenly don’t have ownership of licensing despite having religiously paid for them every month,’ said one Adobe user on Twitter.

‘A nice way to exit without fees would be great.’

Other commentators were more succinct in their criticisms of the company’s email.

‘Another reason why Adobe is garbage!” said another Twitter user in the thread.

Users noted multiple reasons for wanting to keep their older software, including specific features they used and enjoyed being scrubbed by updates and also general ‘bloat’ they say slows the speed of newer versions.

At this stage Adobe are not saying what the installed base of Photoshop users are in Australia or how many people in Australia are affected.

In 2018 Adobe generated over $13 billion dollars in revenue. Prior to the release of their subscription model the Company only generated $1.64M in revenue.

While the switch to a subscription model has helped to bolster revenue, it has also served to alienate some users who say they’re forced into perpetual payments.

While Adobe’s decision to switch to a subscription-based model has helped to bolster the company’s bottom line, the recent fallout of its decision to discontinue and threaten users who use its older software has given rise a more ideological debate.

Notably, critics have pointed out that the new model makes it impossible for users to actually own the software that they use, forcing them into a perpetual cycle of payment.

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