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Has Windows 8 Already Flopped?

 New research reveals that only nine percent of consumers surveyed indicated that Windows 8 has hastened their plans to upgrade, and more than 74 percent still have no immediate plans to upgrade.
 
The survey conducted by Avast also found that immediate interest in Windows 8 is weak, and nearly half of the upgrade-ready respondents are eyeing a Mac or iPad rather than another PC which is a major blow to PC manufacturers who Microsoft is now trying to take business away from by selling their own Surface tablet in direct competition with their long time partners.
 
 The survey, of 135,000 Windows users does not look good for Microsoft who recently delivered a 22% slump in profits.
 
Of the respondents who are ready to buy a new computing device, only 58 plan to acquire another PC as their next purchase. In contrast, 30 percent are more interested in adding an iPad to their device collection, while 12 percent noted plans to buy a Mac.

Windows 8 has been met with mixed reception, as some users find the new interface to be unfamiliar and not immediately intuitive. Microsoft earlier this week announced the departure of Windows head Steven Sinofsky, leading to speculation of internal disagreements surrounding the new software.

Although the iPad is in a separate category from traditional notebook or desktop computers, Apple CEO Tim Cook recently proclaimed that consumers who purchase Windows-based PCs would be “much better off buying an iPad … or a Mac.”
 
Some observers are now asking where the Surface Pro is as Microsoft’s much-hyped, business version of the Windows 8 which has failed to eventuate despite earlier promises.
 
The delay, has thrown the company’s tablet plans, and indeed much of its strategy around Windows 8, into disarray claim Microsoft. They claim the situation may even have contributed to former Windows chief Steven Sinofsky’s sudden exit from the Company this week.
 
In Australia Microsoft is attempting to take enterprise and government business away from their long time partners by going direct with Microsoft executives now pushing Surface RT to enterprise accounts because of the lack of the business Surface Pro tablet.

 
InformationWeek in the USA said recently that Microsoft unveiled Surface earlier this year, revealing two versions. Surface RT, which runs Windows RT and shipped on Oct. 26, and Surface Pro, based on Windows 8 Professional. Windows RT is a Windows 8 derivative designed for consumer tablets. All Windows RT tablets are powered by ARM chips, and are designed to be light and long on battery life. The downside: They won’t run regular Windows applications and are incompatible with many Microsoft security and management tools, including Active DirectoryThat’s where Surface Pro comes in, or was supposed to. It runs full-blown Windows 8, and was intended for business users and others who want legacy application support and compatibility with corporate IT environments. It’s powered by Intel’s Core i5 x 86 chips. It promises full support for legacy Windows software and Microsoft’s back-end admin, security and cloud tools.