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Google Stadia Gaming Platform Taken On By Sony & Microsoft

When Google announced its new game streaming service in March, it did not take long for two major players in the gaming industry to hit back with a surprising alliance.

Microsoft and Sony have teamed up with the announcement of a new AI cloud-based gaming partnership set to take Google head-on.

The move is set to make it harder for Google to penetrate the console gaming market, claim analysts.

Microsoft announced overnight that Sony’s current game and content-streaming platforms will be migrated to Microsoft Azure.

This should help rectify slow download speeds which have plagued PlayStation for years, claims observers.

Sony’s cloud gaming service is currently limited to a few countries, with Australia missing out to date, due to the company lacking the necessary cloud infrastructure to effectively combat the likes of Google’s Stadia.

Google announced last month that they plan to use YouTube to bring its gaming service to the masses and will stream games from the cloud to its Chrome browser, Chromecast and Pixel devices.

Microsoft has promised public trials of its xCloud gaming service this year and has already given live demonstrations and has promised to “go big” at this year’s E3 conference.

xCloud in action.

Besides gaming and cloud services, the companies will also partner on semiconductors and artificial intelligence (AI).

Sony plans to utilise Microsoft’s AI services to improve the user interface in its consumer products and Microsoft intends to create “new intelligent image sensor solutions” with Sony’s image sensors.

“Sony has always been a leader in both entertainment and technology, and the collaboration we announced today builds on this history of innovation,” says Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.

“Our partnership brings the power of Azure and Azure AI to Sony to deliver new gaming and entertainment experiences for customers.”

The deal isn’t just a blow to Google’s Stadia, it’s a loss to Microsoft cloud rival Amazon Web Services who are missing out on hosting Sony’s platform.

The move may give PlayStation the boost it needs to reestablish itself in the gaming sphere following a year of pulling out of conferences and being coy about the next iteration of its gaming console.

Both Sony and Microsoft have stated that additional information will be shared when available, like perhaps cross-play?

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