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YouTube Kids Tops Video Streaming Apps In Terms Of Hours Of Usage

Overall, a report conducted by analytics companies Apptopia and Braze found that video streaming on mobile devices surged by 31% globally in March 2020, as millions more are working from home and staying in.

In terms of hours of usage, YouTube Kids ranked first among the video streaming apps in the first quarter of 2020, followed by Netflix and then YouTube. Hundreds of schools closing their doors across the world as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic would have played a large hand in YouTube Kids becoming a global leader in this metric.

The report found that YouTube came out on top for in-app spending over the first three months of the year, collecting some $110 million.

Meanwhile, Amazon.com Inc’s game streaming platform Twitch reportedly registered nearly $20 million in in-app spending over this same period.

In terms of new app installs, however, Netflix led the global market, registering some 59 million new downloads during the first quarter of the year, according to Reuters.

Roy Morgan research found that in the Australian market, Stan recorded the greatest growth in new users over the past year, gaining 1.09 million new viewers to reach 3.70 million.

This was followed by Netflix, which has 942,000 more viewers than it did a year ago, reaching 12.2 million; Amazon Prime Video, which gained 914,000 to hit 1.48 million; and YouTube Premium, which was up 244,000, at 1.48 million. Disney+ gained 1.80 million viewers in just three months, with the company launching operations in Australia in November 2019.

Foxtel was the only subscription service that had fewer viewers than a year ago, falling by 98,000 to 4.85 million.

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